Gladstone High School

Gladstone High School

Year 11

Curriculum

 

Subjects  
Agriculture & Horticulture History
Biology Stage 1 Essential Maths
Business and Enterprise Stage 1 General Mathematics
Chemistry Stage 1 Mathematics
Community Studies Physical Education
Design & Technology Physics
English Research Practices
Essential English VET - Doorways to Construction
Food & Hospitality Visual Arts
Geography  

 

Agriculture & Horticulture

The study of agriculture and horticulture provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in investigation design, practical techniques, communication, analysis and evaluation of information, and to obtain knowledge and understanding relevant to primary industries. Students investigate issues through topics related to animals, plants, fungi, microorganisms, soils, climate, water, and/or technology, and in a local, national, and/or global context.

Experiments are a part of practical investigations in the study of Agriculture and Horticulture and may take place on farms, in vineyards, orchards, gardens, laboratories, or other relevant locations, and may use a variety of data-collecting procedures, e.g. soil water or grape sugar estimations.

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication and learning.

 

Stage 1 Agriculture and Horticulture

Stage 1 Agriculture and Horticulture can be studied as a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject.

 

Content

Students study topics within one, or a combination of, the following themes:

  • Theme 1: Scientific Principles of Plant and/or Animal Production
  • Theme 2: The Management of Plant and/or Animal Production
  • Theme 3: Enterprise Agriculture and Horticulture
  • Theme 4: Practical and Applied Technologies
  • Theme 5: Contemporary Issues in Agriculture and Horticulture.

Examples of topics:

  • Plant anatomy and physiology
  • Soil science
  • Animal science.
  • Sheep management
  • Livestock assessment
  • Crop husbandry.
  • Designing and setting up a community enterprise
  • The operation of agricultural and horticultural machinery.
  • The effects of soil salinity on horticulture
  • The effects of genetic modification.

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Biology

In Biology students learn about the cellular and overall structures and functions of a range of organisms.  They have the opportunity to engage with the work of biologists and to join and initiate debates about how biology impacts on their lives, on society, and on the environment.

Students design and conduct biological investigations and gather evidence from their investigations.  As they explore a range of biology-related issues, students recognise that the body of biological knowledge is constantly changing and increasing through the applications of new ideas and technologies.

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication and learning.

 

Stage 1 Biology

Stage 1 Biology can be studied as a 10-credit subject or 2 x 10 credit half year subjects). 
However to provide a background to Stage 2 Biology 20 credits of Stage 1 Science subjects should be successfully completed.

 

Content

Examples of areas of study include.

  • Cellular Biology
  • Physiology
  • Ecology

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Business & Enterprise

Business and Enterprise focuses on learning about the successful management of business and enterprise issues in personal, business, and social contexts, locally, nationally, and globally.

 

Students gain an understanding of business operations and practice, develop an awareness of business, financial, and technological skills, participate in planning, developing, and controlling business activities, and evaluate decisions on business practices. They have the opportunity to reflect on current issues in business and enterprise, and make informed decisions.  Students evaluate the impact and effect of business, enterprises, and technology on the well-being and lifestyle of individuals, communities, the economy, and the environment.

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication, citizenship, and learning.

This subject outline gives schools the opportunity to vary the content and/or school-based assessment to develop local programs that suit their needs and interests.

 

Stage 1 Business and Enterprise

Stage 1 Business and Enterprise can be studied as a 10-credit subject.

 

Content
Stage 1 Business and Enterprise comprises two core topics and nine option topics.

For a 10-credit subject, students undertake:

  • one core topic
  • two to three option topics

Core Topics

  • Core Topic 1: Introduction to Business and Enterprise

Option Topics

  • Establishing a Business
  • Business Plans
  • Business Management and Communication
  • Financial Planning and Management
  • Technology for Business
  • Marketing
  • Employment Relations
  • Entrepreneurship: the Enterprising Person
  • Global Business.

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Chemistry

The study of chemistry includes an overview of the matter that makes up materials, and the properties, uses, means of production, and reactions of these materials.  It also includes a critical study of the social and environmental impact of materials and chemical processes.

Students consider how human beings make use of the earth’s resources and the impact of human activities on the environment.  Through practical studies students develop investigation skills, and an understanding of the physical world that enables them to be questioning, reflective, and critical thinkers.

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication and learning.

 

Stage 1 Chemistry

Stage 1 Chemistry can be studied as a 10-credit subject or 2 x 10 credit half year subjects.  However Semester 1 is an essential pre-requisite to Semester 2.
To provide a background to Stage 2 Chemistry 2 x 10 credits of Stage 1 Chemistry should be successfully completed.


Content

The design and content of the program is determined at the school level.  Examples of areas of learning and topics include:

Area of Study

Topics

Matter

particles

 

physical properties

 

 

Reactions

chemical changes

 

equations

 

 

Carbon Chemistry

hydrocarbons

 

organic nomenclature

 

 

Chemical Calculations

mole concept

 

significant figures

 

 

Skills

experimental design

 

graphing

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Community Studies

Community Studies offers students the opportunity to learn in a community context and to interact with teachers, peers, and community members beyond the school environment.
Students decide the focus of their community activity, which begins from a point of personal interest, skill, or knowledge.  By setting challenging and achievable goals in a community activity, students enhance their skills and understandings in a guided and supported learning program.  They develop their capability to work independently and to apply their skills and knowledge in practical ways in their community.

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication and citizenship.

 

Stage 1 Community Studies

Stage 1 Community Studies can be studied as a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject in one or more of the ten areas of study listed below:

 

Content

Students prepare a contract of work to develop a community activity from any of the following ten areas of study:

  • Arts and the Community
  • Communication and the Community
  • Foods and the Community
  • Health, Recreation, and the Community
  • Science, Technology and the Community
  • Work and the Community.

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Design & Technology

Through the study of Design and Technology students develop the ability to identify, create, initiate, and develop products, processes, or systems.  Students learn to use tools, materials, and systems safely and competently to complete a product.  They explore technologies in both contemporary and historical settings, and analyse the impacts of technology, including social, environmental, and sustainable consequences.

Stage 1 and Stage 2 Design and Technology provide enrolment options in the following three focus areas:

  • Material Products  (Construction Technology)
  • Systems and Control Products  (Electronics)

The focus capabilities for this subject are personal development, work, and learning.

 

Stage 1 Design and Technology

Stage 1 Design and Technology can be studied as one or more 10-credit subjects.

Stage 1 Design and Technology provides the following enrolment options:
10 credit subjects:
Material Products I & II

 

Content

  • Material Products – students use a range of manufacturing technologies such as tools, machines, equipment, and/or systems to design and make products with resistant materials. Contexts include metals, plastics, wood and composites.

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English

English may be studied as a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1.
In English, students analyse the interrelationship between author, text, and audience with an emphasis on how language and stylistic features shape ideas and perspectives in a range of contexts. They consider social, cultural, economic, historical, and/or political perspectives in texts and their representation of human experience and the world.

 

SACE LITERACY REQUIREMENT
Students who complete 20 credits of Stage 1 or Stage 2 English with a C grade or better will meet the literacy requirement of the SACE. Credits gained from any of the subjects can be combined with credits gained from other subjects in the English Learning Area.

 

CONTENT
The content includes:
• Responding to Texts
• Creating Texts
• Intertextual Study

 

Responding to Texts
Students explore the human experience and the world through reading and examining a range of texts, including Australian texts, and making intertextual connections. Students demonstrate their understanding of these links by producing, for example, an analytical essay, article, blog, website, documentary, or special features film (behind the scenes about the making of a film), or an oral reflection on language and stylistic features chosen to create a text.

 

Creating Texts
Students create imaginative, interpretive, and/or persuasive texts for different purposes, contexts, and audiences in written, oral, and/or multimodal forms. The text type and mode chosen for creating a text should be appropriate for the intended purpose, context, and audience, either real or implied.

 

Intertextual Study
Students reflect on their understanding of intertextuality by:
• analysing the relationships between texts, or
• demonstrating how their knowledge of other texts has influenced the creation of their own texts.

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Essential English

ESSENTIAL ENGLISH
Essential English may be undertaken as a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject at Stage 1.
In this subject students respond to and create texts in and for a range of personal, social, cultural, community, and/or workplace contexts. Students understand and interpret information, ideas, and perspectives in texts and consider ways in which language choices are used to create meaning.

 

SACE LITERACY REQUIREMENT
Students who complete 20 credits of Stage 1 or Stage 2 Essential English with a C grade or better will meet the literacy requirement of the SACE. Credits gained from any of the subjects can be combined with credits gained from other subjects in the English Learning Area.

 

CONTENT
This subject focuses on the development of students’ skills in communication, comprehension, language and text analysis, and creating texts, through:
• Responding to Texts
• Creating Texts.

 

Responding to Texts
Students consider a variety of ways in which texts communicate information, ideas, and perspectives. They explore the relationship between structures and features and the context, purpose, and audience of texts.
The reading of a wide range of texts enables students to comprehend and interpret information, ideas, and perspectives in texts. They locate and extract information and ideas by, for example, skim reading to support comprehension of key information.

 

Creating Texts
By examining the links between language and the context in which texts are produced, students are supported to create their own texts.
Students develop their skills in using appropriate vocabulary, accurate spelling, punctuation, and grammar to enable effective communication. They create a range of texts using appropriate language features, content, and mediums for different purposes, audiences, and contexts.

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Food & Hospitality

In Food and Hospitality, students focus on the dynamic nature of the food and hospitality industry in Australian society. They develop an understanding of contemporary approaches and issues related to food and hospitality.

Students work independently and collaboratively to achieve common goals. They develop skills and safe work practices in the preparation, storage and handling of food, complying with current health and safety legislation. Students investigate and debate contemporary food and hospitality issues and current management practices.

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication, learning, or work.

 

Stage 1 Food and Hospitality

Stage 1 Food and Hospitality can be studied as a one or two 10-credit subject.

Students examine the factors that influence people’s food choices and the health implications of these choices.  They understand the diverse purposes of the hospitality industry in meeting the needs of local people and visitors.  Delivery of some Certificate 1 in Hospitality may occur.

 

Content

Teachers and Students negotiate study topics within one or more of the following areas of study:

  • Food, the Individual and the Family
  • Local and Global Issues in Food and Hospitality
  • Trends in Food and Culture
  • Food and Safety
  • Food and Hospitality Careers

Pathway:
Desirable, but not essential for Year 12 Food & Hospitality. 
Desirable for development of skills for apprenticeships in some areas.

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Geography

The discipline of geography deals with environmental phenomena and human activities as diverse as natural hazards, landforms, tourism, economic development, agriculture, and urban planning.

Through the study of Geography, students develop an understanding of the spatial interrelationships of people, places, and environments.  They develop an understanding of how people interact with environments differently in different places and at different times, and of the opportunities, challenges, and constraints of different locations.

The focus capabilities for this subject are citizenship, learning, and work.

 

Stage 1 Geography

Stage 1 Geography can be studied as a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject.

 

Content

Students study topics within four key themes:

  • Key Theme 1: Location and Distribution
  • Key Theme 2: Natural Environments at Risk
  • Key Theme 3: People, Resources, and Development
  • Key Theme 4: Issues for Geographers.

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History

The study of history gives students the opportunity to make sense of a complex and rapidly changing world by connecting past and present.  Through the study of past events, actions, and phenomena students gain an insight into human nature and the ways in which individuals and societies function.  Students research and review sources within a framework of inquiry and critical analysis.

The focus capabilities for these subjects are communication, citizenship, personal development, learning, and work.

 

Stage 1 History

Stage 1 History can be studied as a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject.

 

Content

A 10-credit subject consists of:

  • skills of historical inquiry
  • a minimum of two historical studies

A 20-credit subject consists of:

  • skills of historical inquiry
  • a minimum of four historical studies.

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Stage 1 Essential Maths

Stage 1 Mathematics allows students to achieve the numeracy requirement of the SACE. Students who achieve a C grade or better in this subject meet the compulsory 10-credit numeracy requirement.

Stage 1 Essential Mathematics
This subject is designed for (1) students who are seeking to meet the SACE numeracy requirement; (2) students who are planning to pursue a career in a range of trades or vocational pathways. There is an emphasis on extending students’ mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem solving in everyday and workplace contexts, in flexible and resourceful ways.
Stage 1 Essential Mathematics is studied as a 10-credit subject.

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication, citizenship, personal development, work, and learning.


Content

Stage 1 Essential Mathematics consists of the following seven topics:
Topic 1: Calculations, Time, and Ratio
Topic 2: Earning and Spending
Topic 3: Geometry
Topic 4: Data in Context
Topic 5: Measurement
Topic 6: Investing
Topic 7: Open Topic

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Stage 1 General Mathematics

Stage 1 General Mathematics

Stage 1 Mathematics allows students to achieve the numeracy requirement of the SACE. Students who achieve a C grade or better in this subject meet the compulsory 10-credit numeracy requirement.

General Mathematics extends students’ mathematical skills in ways that apply to practical problem solving. Topics cover a diverse range of applications of mathematics, including personal financial management, measurement and trigonometry, the statistical investigation process, modelling using linear and non-linear functions, and discrete modelling using networks and matrices.

Stage 1 Mathematics can be studied as a 10-credit subject.

 

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication, citizenship, personal development, work, and learning.
Content

Stage 1 General Mathematics consists of the following seven topics:
Topic 1: Investing and Borrowing
Topic 2: Measurement
Topic 3: Statistical Investigation
Topic 4: Applications of Trigonometry
Topic 5: Linear and Exponential Functions and their Graphs
Topic 6: Matrices and Networks.
Topic 7: Open Topic

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Stage 1 Mathematics

Stage 1 Mathematics

Stage 1 Mathematics allows students to achieve the numeracy requirement of the SACE. Students who achieve a C grade or better in this subject meet the compulsory 10-credit numeracy requirement.

In the study of mathematics students participate in a wide variety of problem-solving activities. The subject gives students the abilities and skills required in the workplace and in everyday life.  They learn how to approach new challenges by investigating, modelling, reasoning, visualising, and problem-solving with the goal of communicating to others the relationships observed and the problems solved.

Stage 1 Mathematics provides the foundation for further study in mathematics in stage 2 Mathematical Methods and Stage 2 Specialist Mathematics.

Stage 1 Mathematics can be studied as a 10-credit subject.

Stage 1 Mathematics consists of the following list of twelve topics:

 Topic 1: Functions and graphs
 Topic 2: Polynomials
 Topic 3: Trigonometry
 Topic 4: Counting and Statistics
 Topic 5: Growth and Decay
 Topic 6: Introduction to Differential Calculus
 Topic 7: Arithmetic and Geometric Sequences and Series
 Topic 8: Geometry
 Topic 9: Vectors in the Plane
 Topic 10: Further Trigonometry
 Topic 11: Matrices
 Topic 12 Real and Complex Numbers.

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication, citizenship, personal development, work, and learning.

To prepare for Stage 2 Mathematics Studies students must successfully complete 2 x 10 unit credits in Mathematics Studies subjects.

To prepare for Stage 2 Specialist Mathematics students must complete an additional 10 credit subject in Semester 2.

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Physical Education

In Physical Education students gain an understanding of human functioning and physical activity, and an awareness of the community structures and practices that influence participation in physical activity.  Students explore their own physical capacities and analyse performance, health, and lifestyle issues.  They develop skills in communication, investigation, and the ability to apply knowledge to practical situations.
The focus capabilities for this subject are communication, learning, and personal development.

 

Stage 1 Physical Education
Stage 1 Physical Education can be studied as 1 x 10-credit subject or as 2 x 10-credit subjects.


Content
Stage 1 Physical Education consists of the following two areas:

  • Practical Skills and Application
  • Principles and Issues

 

Practical Skills and Applications
For a 10-credit subject, students complete two or three practicals.

 

Principles and Issues (consists of the following two areas of study)

  • The Nature of Physical Activity
  • Issues Analysis

The Nature of Physical Activity
This area of study requires an experimental, analytical approach to physical activity and well-being.  Topics include:

  • body systems
  • participation in physical activity
  • fitness
  • sports injuries
  • human physical performance
  • training principles and methods

Issues Analysis
Students analyse issues that are relevant to local, national or global communities through topics of interest to them.
Topics focus on physical activity and could include:

  • alcohol, tobacco and other drugs
  • health risk factors
  • children
  • play education
  • corruption
  • professionalism in sport
  • cultural diversity
  • safety, risk management
  • fitness
  • sport in society
  • disability
  • sports injuries
  • equal opportunity
  • health risk factors
  • gender
  • play education

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Physics

The study of physics offers opportunities for students to understand and appreciate the natural world.  This subject requires the interpretation of physical phenomena through a study of motion in two dimensions, electricity and magnetism, light and matter, and atoms and nuclei. As well as applying knowledge to solve problems, students develop experimental, investigation design, information, and communication skills through practical and other learning activities. Students gather evidence from experiments and research and acquire new knowledge through their own investigations

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication and learning.

 

Stage 1 Physics
Stage 1 Physics can be studied as a 10-credit subject or a 20-credit subject, but Semester 1 is an essential prerequisite to Semester 2.
In order to progress to Stage 2 Physics students should successfully complete 2 x 10 credit in Stage 1 Physics.

Content
The design and content of the program is determined at the school level.  Examples of areas of study with possible topics and applications include:
Stage 1 Physics comprises the following areas of study, with possible topics and applications:


Movement
Motion in One Dimension
Physics of Transport


Waves
Sound and Light
CD, DVD, and Blu-ray Technology


Electricity and Magnetism
DC Circuits and Motors
Wind Farms and Solar Cells


Nuclear Physics and Radioactivity
Atomic and Nuclear Structure
Fusion v. Fission


Forces
Forces and Newton’s Laws of Motion
Designing Safer Cars


Energy
Energy and Work
Geosequestration or Nuclear Energy

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Research Practices

Research Practices gives students the opportunity to:

  • examine the purpose of research
  • Explore a range of research approaches
  • Develop their investigative and inquiry skills

Students explore research practices to develop skills in undertaking research, such as planning their research, developing and analysing their data, and presenting their research findings. 

In this subject students are expected to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the purpose of research
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of research approaches
  • Develop specific research skills
  • Consider the appropriateness, uses, and limitations of specific sources
  • Interpret and analyse information and data
  •  

    Content

In this subject students explore a range of research approaches and skills.  They learn that different approaches to research are appropriate to different contexts and purposes

Teachers and students select, for focused study, topics from the following areas of study:

  • At least one topic from Exploring Research Approaches
  • At least one topic from Exploring Research Skills

The topics may be integrated, undertaken in parallel, or undertaken consecutively.
They can be taught through the development of, for example:

  • An investigation
  • A performance
  • A product

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Visual Arts

In this subject, students are expected to:
1.  Conceive, develop, and make work(s) of art or design that reflect the development of a personal visual aesthetic
2.  Demonstrate visual thinking through the development and evaluation of ideas and explorations in technical skills with media, materials, and technologies
3.  Apply technical skills in using media, materials, and technologies to solve problems and resolve work(s) of art or design
4.  Communicate knowledge and understanding of their own and other practitioners’ works of art or design
5.  Analyse, interpret, and respond to visual arts in cultural, social, and/or historical contexts.

 

The focus capabilities for this subject are communication and personal development.

 

Stage 1 Visual Arts

Stage 1 Visual Arts – Art can be studied as a 10-credit subject in Semester 1 or 2, or in both semesters.

 

Content

For 10-credit, with a focus on either art or design, the following three areas of study are covered:

  • Visual Thinking
  • Practical Resolution
  • Visual Arts in Context

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